WordPress wp-cli Kung-Fu Made Simple

WordPress wp-cli Kung-Fu Made Simple

Nuno has decided that he has created a project environment by hand one time too many, and explains how this process can be automated using a few wp-cli tricks.

With every new site or project, there comes a new WordPress install, and a few steps are needed before you can start to work. They usually involve one or more of the following:

  • download / update WordPress
  • create a new database and database user
  • set up Apache vhost
  • set up vhost url on system hosts file
  • install your favorite plugins
  • install a theme

This is a fairly simple process, which takes up a few minutes every time you start on a new project. However, since I like to automate things to decrease the chance of screwing up, and saving time, I’ve started to play around to see if I could somehow streamline this process. Keep reading »

Simple Comment Editing - A Review

Simple Comment Editing – A Review

Where Ryan reviews the  Simple Comment Editing plugin and welcomes the reduction in complexity and amount of code.

There is a new plugin in town and it is simply awesome. Many of you will have used the popular AJAX Edit Comments plugin for WordPress. It was created by Ronald Huereca back in 2007 and was very popular; it was unique in giving commenters on WordPress sites the ability to edit their own comments to make corrections.

I have always loved the concept of the plugin and had huge respect for the developer. Building a plugin to handle comment editing in this way was well beyond my capabilities at the time. I could never bring myself to run it on my own sites, though: it included it’s own styling and added a lot of bloat to page loads which slowed things down. It looked out of place.

My respect for the plugin and it’s developer are actually part of the reason I ended up living in Norway. When I realised I needed a job, the first person I turned to was Ronald. He suggested I go work with him at Metronet in Norway, and a month later we were sharing a desk in the same office :)

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WordCamp Lovers Unable to Attend a WordCamp: Meet WP Armchair

Personally I’m addicted keen on going to as many WordCamp as possible, but some of them are in a country that I can’t get to because of whatever or sometimes there are two or more in one weekend. This basically means I can never see all the WordCamps that I’d like to… but I would like be in on the buzz, you know, the stuff people share. Right now twitter is pretty much the best way to keep track, but it’s not ideal. In fact, this is exactly the reason why David Bisset created WPArmchair. Keep reading »

Upgrade your client services with documentation

Upgrade your client services with documentation

Curtis defends that including solid and comprehensive documentation with your projects is probably a task you can no longer ignore, if you want to stand out as a more complete WordPress developer.

When I started building WordPress sites I actually thought my job was done once I handed off the site to the client; the code is written, it is theirs now. I suppose that worked: I was able to pay my bills, but didn’t see many of those clients again.

Then I started providing some documentation and training for clients. Yes, it was a bit of a pain, but curiously enough they kept coming back for more work, and not just more training work, also development work.

I firmly believe that upping my game by providing training and documentation is the reason clients started coming back. Expanding my level of service created a great way for me to earn more, both with my hourly rate and also by having more items to charge for.

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WordPress Turns 10! Thanks Mike & Matt!

WordPress Turns 10! Thanks Mike & Matt!

Remkus celebrates WordPress' 10th anniversary and counts his blessings.

I bet that when Mike Little commented on Matt Mullenweg‘s B2 blog ten years ago, he didn’t realize what the both of them were about to start, which was nothing short of a revolution! Their brainchild is what we’ve come to use and love and know as WordPress. From the bottom of my heart: thank you Matt and thank you Mike for starting this thing.
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