Contributions

Contributing to WordPress is a way of getting involved in the community as well as giving back and helping out with the awesome project that so many of us build our livelihoods on. Check out stories of WordPress contributions, and find out how you can get involved. If you want to submit your own experience of contributing to WordPress, or your own tips, we'd love to hear from you!

The Very First WordPress Mid-Week Codex Sprint

One of the many great things about having a date for a WordPress release in advance, is that other teams can plan activities around it. On the Support blog, Mika has started discussions around her ZOMG! WordPress Updates Broke Me! post. And on the docs blog we’re planning a Codex updating sprint after the launch of WordPress 3.5.

A Codex Sprint?

A documentation sprint is basically when a bunch of people get together to update documentation. Here are some examples of other doc sprints:

  • Confluence
  • Mozilla
  • Web Platform
  • They can be focused on specific areas, or just a general push to get documentation out or updated. For the first WordPress Codex sprint we’ll be updating the Codex to get everything in line with WordPress 3.5.

    When, Where and How?

    You can find the details on the docs blog, but the important things to remember are:

    • Start: Thursday 6th December – 3pm UTC
    • End: Friday 7th December – 5pm UTC
    • Where: IRC freenode #wordpress-sfd (web chat)

    You can get involved at any point during those times – no one needs to be there for 26 hours!

Get Involved with Creating the Ultimate WordPress User Manual

Get Involved with Creating the Ultimate WordPress User Manual

There are plenty of ways to get involved with WordPress - coding, helping out with support, translating and writing. Siobhan explains how you can get involved with the User Manual.

There’s been all sorts of buzz going on over on the make.wordpress.org/support/ blog ever since it was set up. The support folks and documentation writers are an all-round friendly group, and if you’re looking for a way to get involved with WordPress it’s a great place to get started. In fact, if you’d like to help out with WordPress docs and aren’t quite sure how to get started, there’s a project running at the moment which will ease you into the process while giving you a chance to get to know the gang: the WordPress User Manual. Keep reading »

A chance to contribute ideas on theme compatibility and UI to BuddyPress

BuddyPress has come on in leaps and bounds with each release. Currently the 1.7 release is in planning and shaping up to be amazing. One of the main features is going to be theme compatibility. This is the perfect opportunity to ‘take stock’ of how things are currently done in BuddyPress front end and how perhaps alternatives could be Implemented. All in all, a great moment for non developers to get involved in the project. ∞

More Contributor Groups Move to Make.WordPress.org

More and more contributor groups are making the move to make.wordpress.org, with the Polyglots and Core groups recently being moved to .org, and the brand new Events group making an appearance. If you want to get involved with contributing to WordPress, make.wordpress.org is place to get started. The contributor groups currently living there are Core, Plugins, UI, Accessibility, Themes, Polyglots, Systems, and Events.

Only a few more to make the move: I’m looking forward to seeing the Codex team and support finding their own room in the make.WordPress.org home.

If you want to learn more about contributing to WordPress, check out the page on the Codex.

Translate WordPress Part I: Getting Started and Adding Support for a Language

Translate WordPress Part I: Getting Started and Adding Support for a Language

ZĂ© sheds some light on how WordPress supports translated, downloadable packages for installation in almost any language. In this post, you can learn about the basic WordPress translation concepts and find out how you can get started with a translation in your own language.

Reading new users’ posts on the Polyglots blog has made it clear that the structure and processes by which languages are supported in WordPress isn’t obvious to everyone. I hope this post will help to shed some light on how it’s done and how you can play a part.
Keep reading »